2016

CAROLINA EQUESTRIAN MAGAZINE

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2016 FUNDRAISING VIDEO

NOELLE FLOYD "PHOTO OF THE DAY"

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READ THE FULL ARTICLE ON OUR FIRST ANNUAL EVENT AT ASHTEN'S RESTAURANT HERE

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2015

September 30, 2015

Happy 1 year anniversary to us! We have made it a year and saved 518 dogs!!

September 21, 2015

Caring Hearts founder, Jenn Johnston Chopping, was quoted in the local newspaper The Pilot about the relationship between Moore County Animal Center and Animal Advocates. We thank David Sinclair, Managing editor and writer, for his support and taking notice of these issues and writing about them.

Animal Advocates Question Shelter Kill-Rates

The founder of a dog-rescue group says Moore County officials should “welcome” advice from those who want to see the care and treatment of animals improved at its shelter. Jennifer Chopping, who runs Caring Hearts for Canines (CHFC), was indirectly called out by county officials for making “derogatory comments” on her personal Facebook page following the Sept. 1 Board of Commissioners’ meeting. The comments were aimed at Commissioners’ Chairman Nick Picerno, County Manager Wayne Vest and Animal Operations Director Brenda Sears. Sears issued a statement in response that the center and its staff “would not engage in a negative social media campaign” and that any of its rescue partners could “dissolve their relationship” with the center. It did not mention Chopping by name.

In his comments at the end of the Sept. 1 meeting, Picerno accused “a small group” of people of continuing to attack the animal center, its staff and Vest by making “unsubstantiated, non-documented claims.” He proposed, and the commissioners unanimously approved, giving Vest the authority to eliminate a public comments work session normally held the week before the monthly meeting of the Animal Operations Advisory Board if he “deems this anti-productive, just a complaint session.” The sessions are intended to allow Sears, some of her staff and a few advisory board members to meet with interested residents and animal advocates to discuss ways to improve the care of animals and operations of the shelter. “We are here to help rescue dogs,” Chopping said in a written statement responding to the county. “CHFC rescues a significant number of dogs each month from our county shelter. The director should welcome our support and advice, especially if it points to flaws in their program that can be fixed. Instead, they try to silence us by getting rid of public comments altogether. This issue illustrates their sensitivity to criticism and the lengths they will go to.” Chopping said that one of the biggest criticisms she has regards the manner in which Sears calculates the animal euthanasia rate at the center. She said the rate, “which appears to have dropped significantly, has been lauded by Nick Picerno as a great achievement and proof” that the animal center is “working well” under Sears. “Numbers don’t always tell the full story,” Chopping said in her release.

She contends that a change in policy under Sears has impacted reporting in that the shelter now considers heartworm-positive dogs as “unadoptable.” “By redefining this category, numbers are skewed in their favor in euthanasia reports,” she said. “Essentially, the county is not drawing a fair comparison, when these dogs were categorized as adoptable before Sears took over as the director. If you were to add back in animals pulled by rescues and heartworm-positive dogs, the picture at ACMC looks quite different. Not one of success, but one of abject failure.” Chopping said her organization does not consider heartworm-positive dogs to be unadoptable. She said it has treated and successfully adopted many of these animals into new homes. Sears said in response that the shelter does not have a policy that considers all heartworm-positive dogs as unadoptable. She said it is handled on “a case-by-case” basis. She said the county does not have the resources to treat all of the dogs that test positive for heartworms and that it hopes rescue groups and fosters will take on these dogs to keep them from being euthanized. She said using a “more aggressive method” of treating these dogs “in a matter of weeks” can cost $300. A slower method can take six months up to two years. “Some adoption partners are well set and can afford to provide the treatment or have the facilities where they can be sequestered,” Sears said. “It is definitely a commitment.” Sears acknowledged that Chopping’s group has taken a large number of heartworm-positive dogs. She said the center also looks at the live-release rate, not just the numbers that are euthanized. “It is in our best interest to treat as many as we can,” she said. “We’d like to place as many of them as possible.”

Contact David Sinclair at (910) 693-2462 or dsinclair@thepilot.com


2014

PINEHURST, North Carolina—February 19, 2015— Diamonds in the RUFF, the inaugural gala fundraiser for The Farley Foundation (TFF) and Caring Hearts for Canines (CHC) was held at Forest Creek Golf Club, Saturday, February 14, 2015. More than 100 guests attended the event, which grossed more than $20,000 to benefit homeless animals in Moore County and help facilitate their rescue. A silent auction also was held and included nearly 90 items valued at more than $40,000 including artwork, jewelry, golf memorabilia and vacation getaways. Brothers in Music provided entertainment.

Betsy Ficarro, President and COO of TFF said: “We are overwhelmed and honored by the outpouring of generosity from our community.” “We are encouraged by this display of financial assistance and support for our mission” added John Ficarro, Chairman and CEO of TFF. He also noted in a brief presentation to attendees that each dog rescued costs over $200 to save and that there is no shortage of “business” locally. He concluded: “This is why we need your help. The more animals we rescue, the more money we spend . . . and the more volunteers we need to care for the animals at the facility.”

The two Moore County (NC) non-profit animal welfare groups, partnered to raise money to support their combined effort to rescue at-risk animals from area shelters and increase awareness about local animal welfare issues. All rescued animals receive necessary vaccinations, spay / neuter services and any further medical attention that may be needed. TFF’s mission is to reduce the unnecessary euthanasia of unwanted, adoptable animals in Moore County and elsewhere by providing high quality, temporary shelter. Jenn Chopping, President of CHC said her organization provides happy and safe homes for dogs of all ages that have been placed in shelters and manages a network of transporters to rescue groups in areas where demand for adoption of these animals exceeds supply.

TFF operates in association with the owners of Seven Lakes Kennels who provide use of up to 20 large kennels at their boarding facility to help the Foundation fulfill its mission. Both groups pull at risk animals from area shelters while CHC arranges transport to adoption partners. TFF cares for the animals and boards them at Seven Lakes during the transition period in which animals are assessed, socialized, neutered or spayed.

TFF was founded in early 2014 by John and Betsy Ficarro of Pinehurst, NC. It is named in memory of their first shelter dog Farley, a certified therapy dog who was rescued minutes before being euthanized at a North Carolina county shelter. CHC was founded in 2014 by Jenn Chopping of Southern Pines. Ms. Chopping began her work in animal rescue in 2009 and founded Southern Pines- based CHC in 2014. Since their affiliation last fall, the two groups have saved more than 150 unwanted cats and dogs.